I love my work…

2013-05-009

My path in life is to help thinkers use technology to become thought leaders. One of the best things about this path is that I can do it from anywhere! I choose to live in Algoma Wisconsin on the shores of Lake Michigan about 30 miles east of Green Bay and every day on my grueling 3.3 mile commute I get to pass by the lake and admire the view. This morning’s sunrise was particularly spectacular! Inspiration like this gets my juices flowing so I can do better creative work for my clients. How can I help you?

The Questions Coaches Say You Need To Be Asking Yourself

Leigh Newman writes:

Ellie Gordon, a personal and executive life coach, helps us figure out what we really need to be thinking about when we’re looking for lasting, hard-to-make change.

1. Can I Replace The Word ‘Afraid’ With The Word ‘Alert’?
“An artist client recently introduced me to this question,” says Gordon, “and it quickly proved effective at dealing with fear.” Fear, as most of us know, is the biggest obstacle to change. Sometimes our fears are authentic (“My husband is going to leave me because he’s having an affair!”) and sometimes they are inauthentic (“My house is going to blow down even though it’s made out of brick, I have a new roof, and the wind isn’t blowing!”). Either way, we usually try to dismiss our exclamation-pointed feelings as silly, ignore them altogether or blow them up to such a hellacious magnitude that we can’t move, breathe, sleep or… well… live.

Continue reading

'Einstein's Razor' Awards for 2012

albert-einstein-simple-quote1

Einstein said “things must be made as simple as possible but no simpler”. This thinking inspires every aspect of my workflow and the tools I select for myself and my clients. With that in mind, here are the 20% of the tools that yield more than 80% of my results…

Einstein said “things must be made as simple as possible but no simpler”. With that in mind, here are the 20% of the tools that yield more than 80% of my results…

http://storify.com/e1evation/top-content-marketing-tools-for-2012

Be known!

In his epic book “Here Comes Everybody”, Clay Shirky writes:

We are living in the middle of the largest increase in expressive capability in the history of the human race. More people can communicate more things to more people than has ever been possible in the past, and the size and speed of this increase, from under one million participants to over one billion in a generation, makes the change unprecedented, even considered against the background of previous revolutions in communications tools. The truly dramatic changes in such tools can be counted on the fingers of one hand: the printing press and movable type (considered as one long period of innovation); the telegraph and telephone; recorded content (music, then movies); and finally the harnessing of radio signals (for broadcasting radio and TV). None of these examples was a simple improvement, which is to say a better way of doing what a society already did. Instead, each was a real break with the continuity of the past, because any radical change in our ability to communicate with one another changes society.

Shirky, Clay (2009-02-24). Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations (p. 106). Penguin Group. Kindle Edition.

What good, though, is that expressive capability if people can’t find you when they need what you do? You need to be known!

The question is, though, for what should I be known? Everyone’s an expert! How do we know this? Seth Godin told us so long ago in his ebook ‘Everyone’s an Expert’ [About Something]

So now you are an expert. I know it. You know it. It’s the rest of the world that may not know it. Yet. In my humble opinion however you did not get to this ripe old age of wherever you’re at without becoming an expert in something. The 10,000 hour rule is just that – Malcolm Gladwell hypothesized that it takes approximately 10,000 hours of practice to become an expert at something. Now think of all the things you are an expert at!

Here’s the problem, however: your area of expertise may be so narrow or specialized that no one in your town or county or even your state needs it. There are however almost 2,000,000,000 people on the Internet. Even if your expertise appeals to only one in 1 million people that still means there are 2,000 people who need you to guide them. The 10,000 hours you spent gaining your expertise probably means you’re pretty good thinker too. The challenge is you can be the sharpest knife in the drawer but if no one can find the drawer you’ll never get a chance to get out…

Chris Brogan says:

“As you now know, if you have no Google results, in a sense you don’t exist.

Brogan, Chris; Smith, Julien (2010-07-16). Trust Agents: Using the Web to Build Influence, Improve Reputation, and Earn Trust (p. 161). Wiley. Kindle Edition.”

My good friend Dana VanDen Heuvel, a thought leader in his own right, says “there are thinkers and there are thought leaders. They both have a point of view. The thinker has a point of view that is limited by word-of-mouth but the thought leader is only limited by world of mouth.” Using the good, fast and cheap tools available on the Internet a thinker can make his or her thought leadership position searchable, findable, knowable, usable, and shareable. Because of all those ‘ibles’, they may actually become credible. Publishing your thought leadership position will give you a share of voice which may lead to share of mind and ultimately to share of market…
The first step in ‘being known’ is actually accepting the face that you ARE an expert and discovering your ‘onlyness’ as author Nilofer Merchant puts it in her book “11 Rules for Creating Value in the #SocialEra“:

The foundational element starts with celebrating each human and, more specifically, something I’ve termed onlyness. Onlyness is that thing that only one particular person can bring to a situation. It includes the skills, passions, and purpose of each human. Onlyness is fundamentally about honoring each person, first as we view ourselves and second as we are valued. Each of us is standing in a spot that no one else occupies. That unique point of view is born of our accumulated experience, perspective, and vision. Some of those experiences are not as “perfect” as we might want, but even those experiences are a source of ideas and creativity. Without this tenet of celebrating onlyness, we allow ourselves to be simply cogs in a machine—dispensable and undervalued.

Merchant, Nilofer (2012-09-12). 11 Rules for Creating Value in the Social Era (Kindle Locations 107-113). Perseus Books Group. Kindle Edition.

So now we have established the foundation of being known; you have to define your area of expertise and embrace your ‘onlyness’; only then can you take the next step. More next Tuesday…

The wishing/doing gap

Here’s something from Seth Godin to ponder this weekend:

It would be great to be picked, to win the random lottery, to have a dream come true.

But when we rely on a wish to get where we want to go, we often sacrifice the effort that might make it more likely that we get what we actually need. Waiting for the prince to show up is a waste of valuable time, and the waiting distracts us from and devalues the hard work we might be doing instead.

If you can influence the outcome, do the work.

If you can’t influence the outcome, ignore the possibility. It’s merely a distraction.

via Seth’s Blog: The wishing/doing gap.

About That Vision Thing…

Pat Hopkins of Imaginasium in Green Bay [yes, we have very smart people here too!] wrote:

Steve Jobs had it. Bill Gates did, too. Their successors? Not so much.

Don’t get me wrong — Apple and Microsoft may still be successful. It’s just that they’ll never be the same companies that they set out to be.

These days, they’re operating based solely on sound business practices, rather than rallying around a unified, inspiring vision that made them the undisputed leaders in their field.

Same scenario in government: In 2008, Barack Obama had it in droves. This year? Both he and Mitt Romney have played it safe — relying on tried & true tactics rather than a bold vision to rally around. Thus, there’s been no clear leader in the race to date.

And remember good ol’ George H.W. Bush? After serving as Vice President to Reagan — an unequaled storyteller with a clear, compelling vision — he sought to continue the same successful policies for another eight years. Yet, he only served one term.

Bush 41 had an incredible resume — on paper, there was perhaps no one more qualified in recent history than he to serve as president. As he focused on the comfortable role of handling issues one-by-one and in the here-and-now, his advisors urged him to speak to broader themes. He referred to it as “that vision thing,” and didn’t see it as important as solving problems and letting his record speak for itself.

It cost him the election — voters instead rallied around a new candidate who urged them to “don’t stop thinking about tomorrow.” (And Clinton went on to serve two terms, with unparalleled popularity even today).

Vision is what every successful leader and company thrives on, yet one of the hardest things to truly communicate and achieve. In fact, it’s the most critical long-term success factor and challenge you’ll face.

You can get by for a while without it. But you won’t lead your industry. Or make as much profit as your competitor. Or retain the best talent.

And unless you also weave it into a compelling story and get good at telling it, you’re likely to face the same fate.” via About That Vision Thing….

Takeaway? Find yours — vision, that is — and pursue it while you still can…

Honorary Canadian, eh?

e1evation, llc is pleased to have been chosen to design the new blogging home of DX3 Canada — the place where Canadian business gets digital. Click the image to go to the site…

DX3 Digest - Where Canadian business gets digital!

The Coming Prosperity

Just got the signoff on a new site launch for new client Philip Auerswald of George Mason University and the Kauffman Foundation. His new book The Coming Prosperity is out today and we worked hard together to move his site from Blogger to WordPress and implement this Pinterest-style theme from Shaken & Stirred. Click the image to check out Philip’s new site and while you’re there, be sure to buy the book! :-D

Enhanced by Zemanta

Master your Gmail!

Image representing Gmail as depicted in CrunchBase

If Gmail is so easy, why do people still have hundreds — thousands — of unread emails in their inboxes? In part it’s because technology without good thinking and tactics means nothing…

I teach my students that email should be for ‘just in time’ information — information that affects relationships and revenue. Everything else belongs in Google Reader! My friend Dana VanDen Heuvel of The Docking Station talked me into revealing my secrets for effective email handling at an event that happens next week. Here’s Dana’s press release…

“The Docking Station, Green Bay’s first Coworking space, is inviting business professionals to take back their Inbox and attend a free course on how to master Gmail to be more effective and efficient.

“An overwhelming inbox decreases efficiency and productivity,” said Dana VanDen Heuvel, co-owner of The Docking Station. “There are quick and easy solutions to manage your email and make it work for you. A lot of people dread opening their email. This course will help alleviate email stress and make your inbox about creating relationships and bringing in revenue.”

The Gmail course will be taught by Todd Lohenry, owner of e1evation, llc, an international consulting firm that has been educating and empowering business owners and professionals for the past 7 years. “I spent two hours with Todd that will save me at least a gazillion hours. His patient coaching and time-saving processes helped me get to an inbox of zero that same day,” said Carrie Klassen, Creative Director for Pink Elephant Academy for Entrepreneurs.

The Gmail course is part of a series of free events that The Docking Station hosts as part of their mission of being an educational resource to the entrepreneur community. “Our hope is to bring professionals together and connect them to thought leaders and resources that can help them increase productivity and grow their business,” said VanDen Heuvel.

The Docking Station is one of approximately three hundred Coworking spaces in the United States that is redefining the way independent professional work. It was founded by small business owners and entrepreneurs Dana VanDen Heuvel of The MarketingSavant Group and Peter Nugent of Enlighten Financial, LLC. The Docking Station is located at 111 S. Broadway in Downtown Green Bay. To register for the Gmail course, go to http://www.thedockingstation.net/events/ or for more information call The Docking Station at (920) 644-3625.”

If you can’t make it to Green Bay, try my ebook — you can find it online at http://elevation.company/pna. Just click the register link, provide a name and email address and you’ll be on your way to a more productive tomorrow…

Enhanced by Zemanta