What’s Your Superpower?

I must confess that many of the thought I post here come from reflecting on Tara Brach’s podcast to which I listen daily. In her most recent podcast [link below], she spoke about this image…

What’s Your Buddhist Superpower? – Buddhist Peace Fellowship / Turning Wheel Media.

Tara Brach talked about this image in her recent podcast:

2014-02-19 – Part 2: Heart of Compassion – Most of us consciously value compassion, but move through much of life without access to the full capacity of our heart. This talk explores the self-compassion that is the very grounds of loving our world.

Direct download: 2014-02-19-Heart-of-Compassion-TaraBrach.mp3

My superpower IS kindness, but I don’t ‘get into the phonebooth’ often enough, if you what I mean. I often don’t put on my ‘kindness costume’ when I need it most…

Does that make me a failure? No, I think it puts me on a path. It makes me human. HH the Dalai Lama says:

“I don’t know why people like me so much. It must be because I value bodhichitta [the awakened heart/mind]. I can’t claim to practice [it], but I value it.” We care about the awakened heart because, like a flower in full bloom, it is the full realization of our nature. Feeling loved and loving matters to us beyond all else. We feel most “who we are” when we feel connected to each other and the world around us, when our hearts are open, generous and filled with love. Even when our hearts feel tight or numb, we still care about caring.

Brach, Tara (2004-11-23). Radical Acceptance (p. 222). Random House Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

How can I, a fellow being who is much less awakened, condemn myself for not practicing?

My takeaway? Get into the phonebooth. Put on lovingkindness. Even when — ESPECIALLY WHEN — our hearts feel tight and numb…

His wise counsel hits the target every time!

My morning cup for 01/20/14; MLK Day edition…

Dr. Martin Luther King at a press conference.

Dr. Martin Luther King at a press conference. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Remembering Love

img_2943_2-tara-001

Remembering Love (from IMCW Spring Retreat) – The habit of self-judgment not only causes emotional pain, it creates a trance that obscures the purity and vastness of our Being. This talk explores how a wakeful and forgiving heart can heal and free us…


Tara Brach : Remembering Love (Retreat Talk).

 

Trusting your basic goodness…

headshot-tara-brachTara Brach writes:

Einstein says the most important question we will ever ask ourselves is, “Is this universe a friendly place.” Do we trust that there is something essentially benevolent or good about this universe? That we are essentially good? These two talks explore what it means to trust basic goodness, and how this trust naturally emerges through cultivating a meditative presence…

Continue reading

American Minute for August 1st

English: Illustration from an early edition of...Bill Federer writes:

“There she blows!” cried the lookout, sighting Moby Dick.

Captain Ahab, driven by revenge, sailed the seas to capture this great white whale, who had bitten off his leg in a previous encounter.

The crew of the ship Pequod included Quaker chief mate Starbuck, second mate Stubb, Captain Boomer, a tattooed Polynesian harpooner named Queequeg, and Ishmael, the teller of the tale.

Ahab finally caught up with Moby Dick in the Pacific Ocean.

As fate would have it, when the harpoon struck Moby Dick, the rope flew out so fast it entangled Ahab, pulling him under.

This classic was written by Herman Melville, born AUGUST 1, 1819.

Continue reading: William J Federer’s American Minute for August 1st.

I read Melville’s classic during a vacation on the east coast where I visited places from the story like the Seamen’s Bethel in New Bedford and the island of Nantucket. If you’ve never read this classic story, give Netflix a rest this weekend and get a copy. The book is in the public domain so you can download it at no cost and read it on the very device you’re using now via Kindle software

I love being a freelancer in the summer…

Screenshot_2013-07-26-05-40-06As soon as I click publish, I’ll skip a shower, but on 4 pieces of light clothing, gather my gear and get on my bike for the 3.3 mile ride to work. Once I get there, I’ll meditate, do a little yoga and have breakfast. No getting kids off to school, no drama, no nothing. Just a nice morning. Some moments are easier to be present in than others… :-D

 

10 Reasons to Start Today

ລາວ: ການຈັດການຕ້ອງເຮັດໃຫ້ດີ

Craig Harper writes:

1. You’ll never have more time than you do right now.

2. Most people procrastinate because of fear, not logic or reason.

3. Unused potential is wasted potential.

4. Planning, thinking and rationalising, is not doing. Life is not a theory.

5. If you start today, a week from now you’ll be in the middle of a change process rather than talking about one.

6. Taking action builds your emotional and psychological muscles.

7. Transformation lives in the application of the information; not the knowing.

8. It won’t be magically easier a week or month from now.

9. The ‘Opportunity Fairy’ isn’t coming any time soon, so you may need to create one of your own (an opportunity, not a fairy).

10. You’ve put it off for long enough.

11. (bonus tip, no extra charge) I can’t be sure but I think people are on to your excuse-making bullshit.

via 10 Reasons to Start Today.

Big Brother Is Watching: What Did You Expect?

012914fae961c171135b9781a1be4605Arthur Dobrin writes:

We need to think harder about why privacy is important, what we mean by privacy, assess the various trade-offs and create public policies that reflect our values regarding the relationship between individuals and society.

The fear that the US will become a surveillance society is misplaced. It already is one.

The reality is that almost everything about you is already known, if not by the government, then by business. Every time you get on an airplane, you are scanned. Every time you search for a product online, the information falls into the hands of retailers who want you to buy their products.

We are instantly connected to the world—we talk, socialize, get the news, play, pay bills, state our opinions, research, shop. So it should be no surprise that the world knows everything about us in return. The flow of information goes in both directions…

via Big Brother Is Watching: What Did You Expect? | Psychology Today.