Flickr Photo Download: Fire & Ice Sunrise

Out of the Cave

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When you have been

at war with yourself

for so many years that

you have forgotten why,

when you have been driving

for hours and only

gradually begin to realize

that you have lost the way,

when you have cut

hastily into the fabric,

when you have signed

papers in distraction,

when it has been centuries

since you watched the sun set

or the rain fall, and the clouds,

drifting overhead, pass as flat

as anything on a postcard;

when, in the midst of these

everyday nightmares, you

understand that you could

wake up,

you could turn

and go back

to the last thing you

remember doing

with your whole heart:

that passionate kiss,

the brilliant drop of love

rolling along the tongue of a green leaf,

then you wake,

you stumble from your cave,

blinking in the sun,

naming every shadow

as it slips.

via From Out the Cave by Joyce Sutphen | The Writer’s Almanac with Garrison Keillor.

If this poem resonates with you, you might enjoy this meditation from Tara Brach; Stepping out of the cave

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I really need to do this more often… Updated!

…via Instagram!
I am blessed to live an work less than 1 mile from Lake Michigan on the ‘right side’ of Wisconsin. I love the many ‘moods’ of the lake as I travel back and forth between home and work or while doing errands. Yesterday, for the first time I went to the wayside less than a mile from my home, pulled out a folding chair, put my feet up on a fence, listened to good music over the bluetooth headphones and sat and looked at the lake for half an hour. Priceless! What opportunities to ‘stop and smell the roses’ are you overlooking in your life? Need justification? Try this article on 6 reasons to cherish your alone time from Positively Positive…

Big Red

Photographer Bill Pevlor writes:

“This fireworks burst turned the water red. This was part of the 26th annual Shanty Days celebration in Algoma, Wisconsin – on the western shore of Lake Michigan.

The fireworks are launched from the pier and people line the shore to watch the fun. As you can see, I was positioned on the beach, at the waters edge. If you’re familiar with the area, you might recognize the Algoma lighthouse – it’s that little red dot on the far right of the photo, just above the water.” via Big Red | Pops Digital.

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Enjoyment

Melody Beattie writes:

Life is not to be endured; life is to be enjoyed and embraced.

The belief that we must square our shoulders and get through a meager, deprived existence for far-off “rewards in Heaven” is a codependent belief.

Yes, most of us still have times when life will be stressful and challenge our endurance skills. But in recovery, were learning to live, to enjoy our life, and handle situations as they come.

Our survival skills have served us well. They have gotten us through difficult times — as children and adults. Our abil­ity to freeze feelings, deny problems, deprive ourselves, and cope with stress has helped us get where we are today. But we’re safe now. We’re learning to do more than survive. We can let go of unhealthy survival behaviors. We’re learning new, better ways to protect and care for ourselves. We’re free to feel our feelings, identify and solve problems, and give ourselves the best. We’re free to open up and come alive.

Today, I will let go of my unhealthy endurance and survival skills. I will choose a new mode of living, one that allows me to be alive and enjoy the adventure.” via June 14: Enjoyment.

Life is not to be endured

More wisdom from Melody Beattie:

“Life is not to be endured; life is to be enjoyed and embraced.

The belief that we must square our shoulders and get through a meager, deprived existence for far-off “rewards in Heaven” is a codependent belief.

Yes, most of us still have times when life will be stressful and challenge our endurance skills.  But, in recovery, we’re learning to live, to enjoy our lives, and handle situations as they come.

Our survival skills have served us well.  They have gotten us through difficult times-as children and adults.  Our ability to freeze feelings, deny problems, deprive ourselves, and cope with stress has helped us get where we are today.  But we’re safe now.  We’re learning to do more than survive.  We can let go of unhealthy survival behaviors.  We’re learning new, better ways to protect and care for ourselves.  We’re free to feel our feelings, identify and solve problems, and give ourselves the best.  We’re free to open up and come alive.

Today, I will let go of my unhealthy endurance and survival skills.  I will choose a new mode of living, one that allows me to be alive and enjoy the adventure.”

Source: this is a quote “Life is not to be endured; life is to be… | turtle_dove on Xanga

Algoma or Atlantic?

Hmmm. Seems like the windspeed should actually be higher looking at these photos, but apparently it only takes a 22mph wind to make Lake Michigan look like the Atlantic…

Here I am experimenting with two different ways of viewing pictures in WordPress…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Clicking an image below will pull up a nice photo gallery. Both are great native features in WordPress.com!