The end of Google Reader [and what it means to me]…

This is the final installment in my series [rant?] about the death of Google Reader…

Teaching social media in my classes at Northeast Wisconsin Technical College and coaching my clients, I frequently quote the words of the great philosophers .38 Special who said:

Google Reader is gone. No farewell message. No thank you for the support. In fact, I can see my feeds in Google Reader, I just can’t interact with them.

A pretty clear indication that Google really doesn’t give a Tinker’s Damn for customers – only their data and the dollars they can glean from it. This whole experience has had a profound impact on me from the first moment months ago when I first learned that Google was killing Google Reader for no good reason [and believe me, I’ve read them all over the past few months].

This stupid move, along with other ones like Windows 8 by Microsoft leave me wondering where I can place my trust. Oddly enough, I find myself rethinking open source products like Ubuntu, Firefox and Thunderbird. Who knows where that will lead?!

In the meantime, thank you Google Reader. Thanks to you, I consumed over a half a million articles in the past 6.5 years of use and I am what I am today because of what I learned from you. And, thank you feedly for stepping into the breach! I have loved you for over 4 years and used you alongside Google Reader. I’m glad you won the reader race!

How to Cope with the Death of Google Reader

Sonia Simone at CopyBlogger has a post worth your attention on the death of Google Reader:

You know the stages.

First, denial. “No way, dude, that’s got to be a rumor.”

Then anger. “Don’t Be Evil my $%&! How could they do this to me?”

Bargaining. “Could a new version of Google Reader really save Digg?”

Depression. “I can haz no more LOLz.”

And finally, we come to acceptance. Yes, it’s true. Google Reader really is going away on July 1. So if you haven’t rustled up an alternative yet, it’s time.

If you’re a Google Reader user, obviously you need a new tool to read your subscriptions. We have a few thoughts for you on that.

But if you’re a content publisher, you’ll also need to make sure that your audience has a way to continue tuning in for everything you do.

Feel free to point your audience to this post, or you may want to craft a message of your own with more individualized suggestions for your audience’s needs. But be sure you send out a clear, specific call to action and keep those subscribers on board — no one wants to lose a big chunk of their audience just because a tool goes away.

via How to Cope with the Death of Google Reader | Copyblogger.

Frankly, I went through all these stages a month or so ago and happily shifted my attention to feedly which I had used as an alternative to Google Reader since 2009. I’m happy to say that the folks at feedly have really shone in stepping up as the only logical choice to replace Google Reader…

  • It syncs flawlessly in the cloud
  • You can automate it with ifttt.com now
  • It has better features and is more eye appealing than Google Reader

Take a look;

So, Google Reader — good riddance! feedly rocks…

PS I do NOT agree with Simone that email is a replacement for Google Reader! Email should be preserved for ‘just in time’ information; send the just in case stuff to feedly!

The ‘Holy Trinity’ of personal information management…

One of the most important things thinkers who aspire to thought leadership need to do is to effectively manage the information they need to nurture and nourish their expertise…

I firmly believe the single most important issue in social media is not whether or not it works to generate leads; rather, how can I add social media to my already overflowing plate and still get home for supper. I think the first place where people can find additional time in their day is by more effectively handling e-mail. Conversely, I think it’s pretty difficult to think about the idea of becoming a thought leader if you have thousands of unread e-mails in your inbox especially when e-mail can be so easy to manage…

The first of the holy trio is Gmail. There are a lot of tips and tricks that you can apply to Gmail however I don’t think any one of them is more important than this: using e-mail for what I called just-in-time information — information that affects relationships and revenue. Everything else belongs somewhere else! If your e-mail inbox doesn’t look like this then you’re going to have a hard time adding the extra work that you need to do to establish your thought leadership position…

Your inbox CAN look like this most of the time...
Your inbox CAN look like this most of the time…

The second member of the holy trio is feedly. I use feedly to track the sites, searches and sources that nourish my expertise. Instead of chasing information around the Internet I make the things I need to know flow to me. Because feedly is completely cross platform down to the smart phone level I can use it in Mac, Windows or Ubuntu [I prefer Chrome as my primary browser and all three] or on an Android or iOS device. Feedly gives me the ability to create a virtual newspaper jammed with the best content in the world and it’s free! It also allows me to quickly share the good things I find…

Use feedly to create a virtual newspaper that nourishes your expertise...
Use feedly to create a virtual newspaper that nourishes your expertise…

Last but by no means least is Evernote. Evernote is a cloud-based app that is completely cross platform down to the smart phone level so I can access the things I save from anywhere…

Evernote is the best platform for saving and sharing great information...
Evernote is the best platform for saving and sharing great information…

These three tools together give me everything I need to effectively manage the information I need to continually refresh my expertise. In the following screen cast of show you some of my favorite tips for using all three:

These are just the first three tools in my workflow — you can find more ideas here. If you could use some help managing the information you need to stay on top your game please contact me and ask me about personal digital coaching…

“Repent! The end is near.” Prepare yourself for a world without Google Reader…

I saw the reminder again today…

If you were hoping against hope that Google was going to come to their senses and change their mind you were in denial. It’s time to wake up and smell the feedly coffee! Digg is moving too slowly to help people in transition so my official recommendation is to move to feedly…

Here’s how you can prepare for the ‘end of the Google Reader world’…

Feedly mobile is fixed!

…and everything is right in my ‘Personal News Aggregation’ universe. For about a week, I was having problems syncing my accounts on feedly and Google Reader and it was really frustrating — especially since it has always worked so well in the past. As you can see, however, my desktop version…

4-18-2013 3-18-41 PM

…is the same as my tablet version…

Screenshot_2013-04-18-15-20-21

Nirvana!!! :-D

 

How to make feedly your default rss reader in Chrome

Do you love feedly as much as I do? Here’s a short 3 minute lesson on how to make it your default rss reader:

Here’s the text to copy and paste:

http://www.feedly.com/home#subscription/feed/%s

Of course, you can also subscribe using the Feedly Mini button but if you’re used to using that RSS icon this will help! Questions? Feedback?

The death of Google Reader

Ironically, Google produces no original content of their own but is engaging in a ‘shaping strategy’ than is killing products that curators use…

Ironically, Google produces no original content of their own but is engaging in a ‘shaping strategy’ than is killing products that curators use…

Ironically, Google produces no original content of their own but is engaging in a ‘shaping strategy’ than is killing products that curators use…

http://storify.com/e1evation/the-death-of-google-reader