How to Make Tea

How to Make Tea - Prevention.com

Lately, I have been turned on to the joy of loose leaf tea. My ‘tealologist’ Jenelle of Caffe Tlazo in Algoma, WI says that the tea we buy in the grocery store is the ‘hot dog‘ of teas made of from the floor sweepings of the good stuff. You can learn more about making good tea here: How to Make Tea – Prevention.com. Ask Jenelle if you want to know more about buying good tea once you know how to make it…

7 Reasons to Love Apple Cider Vinegar

Jess-Ainscough-wellness-2Jess Ainscough writes:

I was first introduced to apple cider vinegar (ACV for short) several years ago after reading in a magazine that Fergie (Black Eyed Peas, not Duchess of York) takes a couple of teaspoons each day to assist weight loss. A body like Fergie by drinking apple cider vinegar? That is one bandwagon I was quick to jump on. While I’m still waiting for Fergie-like abs, I have been reaping the many other health benefits associated with including a little ACV in my diet. ACV has been touted for it many medicinal properties for yonks and it really is a cure-all remedy.

These are just a few benefits of apple cider vinegar…

Full story at: 7 Reasons to Love Apple Cider Vinegar.

It sounded disgusting to me, but I got used to it and it will certainly benefit your body more than that Coke you’re slugging with your meal. Continue reading

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12 Rules to Live By

My Philosophy Bookshelf(top)

Craig Ballantyne writes:

The one thing I admire about people who have strong nutrition beliefs is their dogmatic behavior.

For example, a vegetarian, under no circumstances, will ever eat meat. There is no, “well, everyone else is having a burger, so just this once, I will too.”

That’s not how it works.

Not when a vegetarian has a strong personal philosophy that they never, ever, ever eat meat.

And that strong personal philosophy guides them to guilt-free behavior that is congruent with their goals.

I’ve also taught my fat loss clients to develop their own personal philosophy – essentially a set of rules that dictate decisions, and I’ve also created my own rules that determine how I live my life so that I reduce guilt, stress, and wasted emotional energy.

Now the purpose of this email is not to say that my personal philosophies are wrong or right.

Instead, they are simply here to encourage you to adopt your own rules for the sake of living a better, more productive stress free life. You may have your own rules in your head, but I encourage you to put them in writing. And you can adopt a set of rules for every aspect of your life, from health to financial to family and business.

Go to the source if you’d like to get the rest of Craig’s perspective: » 12 Rules to Live By :zenhabits

Create Healthy Habits!

Take 21 days to create a new healthy habit and the habits you create will take care of you! With what healthy habits would you like to start the new year? A year from now, you’ll wish you had started today…

Oh, and by the way if you’re a geeky type you might want to look into tools like Habitforge to get you started!

image via Visual Inspiration: Create Healthy Habits!.

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Maple-Roasted Turkey with Sage, Smoked Bacon, and Cornbread Stuffing Recipe

I’m already dreaming of Thanksgiving! Here’s a recipe for Thanksgiving Turkey that is soooo easy a guy can do it. I know because I used it for Christmas dinner last year and I totally rocked it…

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 1/2 bunch fresh sage, leaves finely chopped
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 large onions, finely chopped
  • 1 loaf cornbread, cubed (about 6 cups)
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 3 cups chicken stock
  • 1 (12 to 14 pound) fresh turkey
  • 1 cup pure maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup hot water
  • 8 strips smoked bacon
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F and remove the top rack.

Combine the butter and sage in a mixing bowl, mash with a fork or spoon until the sage is well incorporated and the butter has flecks of green in it; season with salt and pepper.

In a saute pan, melt 4 tablespoons of the sage butter, add the onions, cook and stir for 15 minutes until soft and golden. Remove from heat. Put the cornbread in a large mixing bowl and scrape the sauteed onion mixture on top. Add the egg, heavy cream, and just enough chicken stock to moisten the stuffing without making it soggy (about 1/2 cup.) Toss well to combine, season with salt and pepper.

Remove the neck and gizzards from the inside of the turkey and discard. Rinse the bird thoroughly inside and out with cold water, pat dry. Sprinkle the cavity and skin liberally with salt and pepper. Using your fingers, gently lift the skin from the breast and legs, and slip pieces of the sage butter underneath; massaging it in as you go. Fill the bird with the cornbread stuffing without packing too tightly; cook the remaining stuffing separately in a buttered baking dish. Truss the turkey; place it on a rack in a large roasting pan, and put into the oven.

Meanwhile, in a small mixing bowl, whisk together the maple syrup and hot water to thin the glaze out a bit; use this to baste the turkey every 30 minutes. The turkey should take about 3 hours to cook (i.e. 15 to 20 minutes per pound.) If the legs or breast brown too quickly, cover with foil.

About 2 hours into cooking, shingle the strips of bacon oven the turkey breast to cover; continue to roast and baste for another hour or so. The turkey is done when an instant-read thermometer inserted into the meatiest part of the thigh registers 170 degrees F (the thigh juices will also run clear when pricked with a knife.) Transfer the turkey to a cutting board and let rest for 20 minutes before carving, so the juices can settle back into the meat.

Skim off the excess fat from the pan drippings with a spoon and place the roasting pan over 2 burners set on medium-high heat. Using a wooden spoon, scrape up brown bits stuck to bottom of pan. Whisk the flour into the drippings, stirring as it thickens to prevent lumps. Add the remaining chicken stock and bring to a simmer; season with salt and pepper and hit it with a squeeze of lemon juice to brighten the flavor. Simmer for 5 minutes and then strain to remove any particles. Serve the gravy with the maple-roasted turkey and cornbread stuffing.

Source: Maple-Roasted Turkey with Sage, Smoked Bacon, and Cornbread Stuffing Recipe : Tyler Florence : Recipes : Food Network