Effective information management

Threefold path to effective info management (1)

These days it seems that we’re drowning in information and starving for wisdom. Here is some ‘wisdom’ about three tools that will help you manage information more effectively if you will take the time to learn how to use them:

Digging deeper into Gmail

Everything I have ever written about the magical tool called Inoreader can be found here. If you need help managing the information that’s flowing into your world, I can help. Consider this review and contact me using the form below…

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Feedly vs Inoreader

Feedly vs Inoreader

According to the Pew Study on Internet and the American Life, only about 11% of American internet users know how to use a feed reader. For me, a feed reader is one of my 3 most important tools. Today I look at a ‘rising star’ — Inoreader — and compare it to Feedly, the tool that has been my standard for the past two years. h/t Brian Clark. Here is my take on Feedly vs Inoreader from the early days of usage back in April:

Now, six months later I am still using Inoreader every day. I stopped subscribing to Feedly immediately after this post and I went on to blog about my experiences with Inoreader 18 times during in that six months — more than any other tool I use. You can read every post and see every screencast here.

As I have mastered new features, my workflow has changed. I don’t know how long I’ve been using Inoreader the ways I am today, but here is my current strategy and you are free to use this or make up a different one that works better for you:

  • I over-subscribe to opml feeds from Alltop, the ‘magazine rack’ of the internet
  • I use the rules feature to scrape the titles of content in these feeds knowing that anyone who writes intentionally would put the keywords I’m searching for in their title
  • I then flip through the 200 or so articles this process yields every morning and curate their content where applicable

Here’s what it looks like:

If having this kind of information is valuable to you for research or content marketing, etc., then Inoreader is the tool for you. I encourage you to do your homework, but include Inoreader in your short list of tools that you evaluate. Questions? Feedback? I love to talk about Inoreader and why content readers are so important!

Things thought leaders do; use Evernote and Inoreader

inoreader logoSometimes the difference between a thinker and a thought leader is just a few extra steps that the thought leader is willing to do that the thinker is not. In this short screencast, I show two extra steps a thought leader could take that will deliver value and insights for years to come. Don’t just retweet a good article; save it in Evernote and add the RSS feed to Inoreader so that you’ll begin to build up an inventory of good articles and a source that will keep on giving! Watch this quick 3 minute screencast to see how…

Take a little time to add Evernote and Inoreader to your mix — you can thank me later… 😀

How to get incredible insights from your Twitter feed

Getting value from your Twitter feed can be difficult. Regardless of how careful you’ve been to follow only the top thought leaders in your industry, there will be times when even they miss the mark. In some ways, logging into your Twitter account and expecting to find something meaningful or relevant at the top of the feed is a recipe for disappointment — in a way, it’s like sitting by the highway trying to find something meaningful on the bumper stickers of cars as they pass by. There is a good way, however, to harvest incredible insights from your Twitter feed and readers of the blog will not be surprised that it involves Inoreader.

There are two steps involved. The first is to connect your Twitter account and subscribe to your home feed like this…

Todd Lohenry: I can help you get found in Google

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This will give you your entire feed in a place where it’s searchable…

Todd Lohenry: I can help you get found in Google

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The second step is to use the Rules feature to pull whatever you want out of that feed. I use rules to pull out mentions of content marketing, online reputation, seo, etc. The things that are important to me. Then instead of having to wade through the over 4000 tweets that enter my home page every day, I only have to pay attention to the ones that meet your criteria:

Todd Lohenry: I can help you get found in Google

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Here’s the result:

Todd Lohenry: I can help you get found in Google

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This is so easy to do that some of the simplicity may have escaped you. When I find a way to efficiently capture all this information and pull out the things that are really relevant, I’m not only saving myself time and money, but in a way I’m creating my own virtual news service and ‘hiring’ all the people in my Twitter feed as ‘free’ reporters. They are doing the work of finding and sharing great information – I’m capturing it in a tool that delivers great value and incredible insights to me. Another title for this post could be ‘How to get everyone on Twitter to do your work for your for free’. 😀

I hope that in my attempt to make this as simple as possible, I did not miss out on any important points. Please, please, please ask me to clarify! Although this is a simple process, it’s one of the most valuable pieces of information I can share with someone who needs to manage information to build their online reputation.

How I use Twitter, Google+ and Inoreader

If I could only use three tools to track the sites, searches and sources that are important to helping me deepen my expertise and build my online reputation through creation and curation, without a doubt they would be Twitter, Google+ and Inoreader. In this post, I’ll try to show you some of the tools and tactics I use to make sure I’m getting the content I need to read every day and doing it as efficiently as possible.

Twitter

I use Buzzsumo to find the most influential people in my space and then I add them to a ‘thought leaders’ list in Twitter. Trying to find value in my main Twitter stream can be tough, so a list helps me to focus on what’s really important. I can also use TweetDeck or even the rules function in Inoreader to scrape my Twitter feed for the keywords on which I focus. Lists remain the most fundamental organizing tool to help make sense out of Twitter!

Todd Lohenry

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Google+

I use Circlecount and Circloscope to find and follow the people who are most important to my business thinking with my business page and the most important ones are put into the VIP circle. I turn notifications for that circle on and then I try to check every notification I get so that I never miss an important post from someone I consider to be a VIP.

Todd Lohenry

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Inoreader

When you’re ready for a more powerful and comprehensive solution, it’s time to step up to Inoreader. Here are a couple of ways that I use Inoreader to harvest important thoughts:

  1. Follow my own Twitter feed and scrape it for keywords using the Rules feature.
  2. Subscribe to OPML feeds from Alltop and other sources which use teams of human editors to find the best content available and then again, scrape them for keywords using the Rules feature.
Todd Lohenry

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Todd Lohenry

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This second tactic will deliver approximately 15,000 articles to my Inoreader every day – more than I can possibly read in one week, let alone one day! Power features like Active Search and Rules deliver only what I need to read at the moment and when I’m doing research, searching the content I have already collected in Inoreader means I’m conducting a more precise search of sources that I already know and trust.

One of the most valuable tips I’ve picked up recently came from Inoreader expert Marjolein Hoekstra who recommended only searching for keywords in article titles. Her logic is flawless: if an author is writing on purpose for seo, the keyword should appear in the title. If you’re interested in becoming an Inoreader power user, here’s a link to her online manual which was the key to my success in mastering Inoreader.

Todd Lohenry

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If you’re looking to build your online reputation through curation or creation, these are three simple but powerful approaches that may help. I’d like to hear what YOU do and what you think about this approach. Questions? Feedback?

Consuming information on slow internet

This article at MakeTechEasier caught my eye this morning. In it they talk about one of my favorite topics – news aggregation –  but from a perspective efficiency, particularly as it applies to preserving bandwidth.

In the last couple of years websites have gotten heavier and heavier. It’s not uncommon for a web page from a mainstream tech news site like The Verge to weigh 10 MB. And we’re talking about a simple news article here – nothing fancy, just a couple hundred words and an image or two. And this is not just limited to The Verge. If you have a slow internet connection or if you’re tethering while on a vacation, it would take more than a minute to load a news article. I know because I tried it.

And if you are using a limited data plan (say 500MB per month), and if every web page takes 10 MB to load (caching would help of course), you can blow through your 500 MB of data just by visiting 50 websites. Mind you, that is the monthly quota. I am sure you visited more than 50 websites per day.

Go to the source for more: The Complete Guide to Catching Up on News on Slow Internet

It may be hard to imagine that in this day and age some people still struggle with low speed internet, but I live in rural Wisconsin where my computer connection to the internet is a cellular modem that on a good day may give me a connection slightly faster than dialup. Still, because of resource saving content readers like Inoreader, I don’t have to feel cut off from the information I need. In fact, what most people would consider a liability, I’ve managed to turn into an asset in that working in a low bandwidth situation has made me dig deeper to become more productive!

Consuming information on slow internet

Mind you, content readers are not just for people in low bandwidth situation but for anyone who needs to track sites, searches, sources or someday/maybe information. To me this is anyone looking to build their online reputation; Inoreader is a linchpin tool in my online reputation workflow because it allows me to both consume and publish information easily from the same tool while preserving time and bandwidth. I’d be reluctant to say that it’s the most important tool in my toolkit, but it’s certainly one of the top 3 that I use and if any of what I said – either about needing to work more efficiently under low bandwidth situations or managing information more effectively, I encourage you to look into Inoreader. You can find all my articles on Inoreader by clicking here.